Ecological Future

Our Earth is losing more resources than can possibly be replaced. We consume far too much and it is unsustainable. Governments worldwide will do nothing about this because they are only interested in tackling economic growth, taxation and export income, to pay down equally unsustainable national debts.
 
So, it is really up to every individual person to consciously decide to reduce consumption and find alternative solutions to promote health, welfare and happiness.

Earth Resource Analysis posted by http://www.Macat.com

Lots of course, can be done to live sustainably

Posted by Rob Greenfield Sustainable Living
Rob’s website is a really good resource for growing your own food and reusing materials in creative ways.

http://robgreenfield.tv/sustainableliving/
That’s easy enough for us who are working and living in a wealthy society. 
But what about those people who live in poor communities in other parts of the world?

Jon Jandai’s story is inspiring

Posted by TED talks
Pun, Pun Farm, Chiang Mai, Northern Thailand. Jon Jandai: ‘Life is easy. Why do we make it so hard?’
You can find out more about volunteering at Pun Pun Farm here: 

http://punpunthailand.org/

And there are opportunities to help other sustainable world projects. Here is just one of many links

http://wwoof.net/

Organic farming and sustainability programs

But what of our individual consumption…where do we start at home and can we make a difference with our purchases? The answer to that is YES, we can make a huge difference if we know what is wasteful!

The Carbon Footprint of Consumption TED talk 2016
So buying local, unprocessed food from sustainable sources is going to make a huge difference. And so is reducing material goods that we don’t really need.
Making your own toiletries, household cleansers, and food will keep you healthy, reduce chemicals, packaging and waste and lower your carbon footprint exponentially.

These following websites offer lots of advice, ideas and help with awareness of do’s and don’ts and how to source goods sustainably.
http://www.onegreenplanet.org
http://www.naturalhealth365.com
https://www.esa.org/esa/education-and-diversity/what-does-ecology-have-to-do-with-me
https://www.treehugger.com
http://m.huffpost.com/us/news/environmental-issues
http://greenlivingideas.com

And here are some household Tips on how to improve your daily ecological living from Clare Delaney @ecoexpert1 (on Twitter)
http://www.ecofriendlylink.com/blog/

Here is one of Clare’s many examples of how you can replace household purchases with inexpensive eco friendly alternatives.

Posted by Clare Delaney

Let’s start joining the conversations, listen to the thoughts and ideas of other change-makers, and get in touch with what really makes us happy, healthy and free of pollution, waste and greed.

Posted by Anne Brown
http://www.cellonline.org

We need to start thinking about ecological futures for every country around the globe, so if you want to study ecological living for sharing with others, find out more about this promising venture and earn university credits towards your degree through informative worldwide study programs
http://www.cellonline.org
You may have exciting ideas for new ways to cut our ecological footprint.

James Greyson of the United Kingdom, has been developing a circular economy plan for many years. He can be found on TED talks and on his own website where he shares his ideas about creating new ways to leverage global change, far beyond what we all can do individually.

http://blindspot.org.uk/about

@climate_rescue (Twitter)

@blindspotting (Twitter)

James Greyson won the 2016 MIT Climate CoLab contest with this invention of a wood drying chimney to cut carbon emissions produced by wood fueled cook stoves (much of the third world still cooks and heats homes using woodstoves).

James has also begun a new  ‘Virtual Think Tank’ to tackle Climate Change and Global sustainability on Patreon, if you think you may like to take part brainstorming in this new community offering your research and ideas, you can find out more at 

https://www.patreon.com/blindspotting
 

If you are a Twitter user, try a search using ‘#EarthOptimism’ as a starting point to find out what else you can do to encourage, and engage with others in the discussion on an an ecological future!

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What Have We Done & What Will We Do?

What have we Done?

There is an animation called ‘Man’ by Steve Cutts, wwwhttps://youtu.be/jid2A7ldc_8.stevecutts.com that accurately sums up Man’s impact on planet Earth. This three and a half minute video is possibly the most damning portrayal of our abuse of the planet, its animals and its environment, for our own selfish gain. See for yourself:

What Will We Do?

It is up to man, (humans), to make reparations for the mess we have made of the Earth. Our planet cannot take any more of our unconscious polluting, killing, abusing or selfish lifestyle that we have adopted through all human history. We have become parasites, and when parasites are too numerous, they kill the host, which in this case, is the supportive, biodiverse ecosystem that gives us life. Earth.

The Gaia foundation commissioned Steve Cutts to produce this short animation as a wake up call to all of us on our constant demand for material goods. The lesson is clear…it might already be too late if we do not wake up! We must reduce our demands and our waste. See for yourself:

And, one of the biggest problems we have, is the sheer numbers of humans on the planet. If we are going to survive as a species and still continue to grow our numbers we really need to look at our eating habits, because our food choices are actually making the planet evolve to one that will no longer support life as we know it! It is sick, the temperature rising, and we are not doing anything to make it well again.

See for yourself: A Video posted by Socioecological Researcher on Youtube.

Bee All: End All

When Anna Breytenbach (Interspecies Communicator) asked a Sunflower buzzing with bees collecting nectar and pollen, ‘how it felt?’ the answer she received was, ‘The bees kiss me with their awareness!’

Many varieties of bees have existed on the earth since the first flowering plants evolved millenia before humans ever walked. They are some of the most social animals that exist but they are dying in numbers that are truly horrifying.

Martha Spivak, giving her Ted Talk in September 2013, shares her concerns:

The bee is not just an insect ‘without feeling or emotion’ as some of my friends have often stated to me. They do not sting for ‘no reason’ and they are not without compassion or intelligence. It is well documented by commercial bee keepers that bees communicate the location of nectar sources on a high level, they groom each other, cool and heat the hive together, and they sacrifice themselves for the good of the hive community.

I have often picked up drowning bees and let them walk on my hands drying themselves until they are fit to fly. I have never been stung by any of them.

Peter Nelson explains our relationship with bees in his video ‘Dance of the Bees.’

Recently, a cold and sudden winter wind blew foraging honey bees into the shade on my patio. The cold quickly disabled them (bees will die very quickly if their body temperature drops below 13.5 C) and they crawled helplessly, getting slower and more crippled by the extreme change. Some had already folded themselves up, trying to conserve what little heat they had but quickly becoming dormant bodies. I gathered dozens in my hands. Their stingers came out, but as soon as they felt the heat in my hands, and my damp breath trying to warm them, they stopped and became relaxed, their abdomens pulsing. I transferred them gently to a clear box, placing them on paper towel and put them beside a fan heater. After a few seconds, the strongest came to life, and immediately crawled over to those that had not. They put their mouth parts into the pollen sacks of the invalids and took much of the pollen, but they didn’t steal it. Instead they gave it back to the invalid by mouth and stimulated them with their antennae. There was much scurrying as all the bees revived each other and took part in this strange ritual… a caring rescue of saving their sisters and themselves. A short time later, after they were warmed and buzzing… I released them back into the sunshine so they could return to the hive.

We should learn that what we do to bees, we do to ourselves. The pesticides and herbicides are slowly killing them (something that will affect our health too). Commercial bee keepers take as much as 90% of the honey and pollen from hives, replacing it with high fructose corn syrup (a cheap and poor nutritional alternative) for the bees to use to feed themselves and developing larvae. The result is weakened bees that have no defenses against Varroa mites and bee viruses.

Without bees, a whole link in the interdepedent food chain disappears and we will have lost a very special animal. But worse, we will lose vast crops essential to feeding ourselves. It is time to be kind to the bees! Our future depends on it!

Finally, Michael Sutton sums up some interesting facts about Honey Bee Life in this amazing short video: